Discovering Advanced Spatial Functions - Inspire 2017

If you've explored the basics of spatial analytics in Alteryx, this session will help you dig even deeper. We'll showcase how to create advanced maps in Alteryx and integrate it into other spatial tools. We'll also discuss advanced geocoding techniques using Alteryx spatial tools and cover topics such as distance between two points, spatial match, supporting features for kml and geojson codes, and the tricky business of linking US & Canadian addresses with latitudes and longitudes as well as Zip codes.



Video Transcription


Gene Rinas:
Okay. So this is Location, Location, Location: Discovering the Advanced Spacial Functions. We did a session yesterday that was a little bit more along the lines of just an introduction. So I'm going to try not to repeat too much of the information that we did at that one, but a little bit of that I will just in case folks weren't in the room yesterday so that they understand what I'm talking about about things like spatial objects and such. So I do want to repeat our forward looking statements. So I have no privy to anything that's happening in the future, but if I say "may, will" or "could be" or whatever, you're not allowed to hold me to it. We have our disclaimer here. So you guys can... Probably had a chance to read through that a dozen times in the sessions you've been in, but I have shown it to you. So don't hold me to forward looking statements. Okay.

All right, so the agenda today. We're going to do a quick spatial review, just for anybody who doesn't do a lot with geo-spatial. How many people use the spatial tools on Alteryx right now? Okay, so that's two thirds of the room. No pressure on me there. Okay, good. And if I say something wrong, we can make this pretty interactive along the way, too. But we're going to talk a little bit about the tools that are here for geo-spatial. Some of the geo-spatial data, but we're really... We're going to get into some demos, some hands on stuff. I'd really hate to spend too much on PowerPoint. I'd much rather spend the time on Alteryx, 'cause that's where you guys are going to get the most out of it. So we'll try and balance that off as best we can. So...

When I... For anybody who doesn't know, when I talk about a spatial object, a spatial object inside of Alteryx can be a point, a line, or a polygon typically. So a point is just a latitude and longitude. It is the sharpest pencil dot you could put on the ground. As a location it has no area associated with it. Lines are continuous. They go from one place to another, but they don't connect back around typically. For that, it would be a polygon. Polygons have areas associated with them. So think of a county or a state or a zip code... Well, some zip codes. Some zip codes are points. But an area zip code. You can draw a boundary around it and it comes all the way back to the beginning point. So that's what a polygon is.

So there's a lot of different spacial file formats that are supported by Alteryx. And it's kind of good to know a little bit about some of them. The Alteryx YXDB format that is highly recommended for any data that you want to use, not just geo-spatial data, but any data that you just want to use inside of Alteryx. You don't have to send it out to another place. You just want it available for you in Alteryx. The YXDB format is that column or data store that's highly indexed along the way. And if you've noticed that sometimes if you read in CSV file or an Excel file with a million rows, it might take 10 seconds or 15 seconds to read in. If you ever take that same file and output it as a YXDB, it'll read in .2 seconds. So Alteryx doesn't have to do any conversion when you're working with that file format.

But from a spatial perspective, the YXDB format will hold as many different types of spatial objects as you want in as many columns as you need inside of the same file. So if we look at other spacial formats like the ESRI Shape file or the MapInfo TAB or MID/MIF files, they're... They can only have one spatial object per row of data. They can only have one column that's a spatial object. But Alteryx can have as many as you want. So it becomes a really good way to store data as you're going along. So Calgary, we're going to be talk quite a bit about that as well. How many people have heard of the Calgary file format in Alteryx? So less people, okay. So Calgary is a really highly indexed format, and you create separate indexes for everything. And one of those indexes that you can create is for point data or point object. So think about the Experion household file with over 120 million household points on the map. And if you want to do a spacial query to query out just the ones that are within a mile of your house, within a 5 minute drive time of your house, that is a very complicated spacial process to do. Especially in other tools like ESRI or MapInfo. And Alteryx can do it in a couple of seconds. And we're going to see an example of that.

GRC, GRD files. That's the "can you hear me now" file that's used by the telecom industry. Google Earth KML is an output or an input option inside of Alteryx, so if your plan is to do some sort of mashup out on Google, that's a good file format to use for that. Geo JSON, we're not going to talk too much about that one, but if you download the presentation at the end, I actually did put a slide in as an appendices in the back. JSON data is really good for streaming data and also for API, so if you're building something with an API that's going to call Alteryx to maybe geo-code an address and bass it back to your application. You'd pass that information in JSON as you were going along with the API. That's how it would be transported. And then any data file that has an address or LAT/LON could potentially be spacial data along the way.

All right, so some of the tools we'll talk about... I'm not going to go through all of them 'cause we're actually going to use some of them to be able to do things, but all of those green tools are all the spatial tools. So the ability to create points, and build polygons, and break polygons apart, and smooth things. Damien was using a formula tool today during the presentation to be able to make the lines to be able to connect the different locations around Las Vegas this morning. So formula tools can support. Geo-spatial functions as well as the summarize tool has a geo-spatial category in it as well. And we'll play with a few of these.

And then ancillary data that comes along with it. So... I don't know if I put the slide in or not, if I did we'll just skip over it when we get to it we'll talk about it first. But you don't need to have the geo-spatial package with Alteryx to use the geo-spatial tools. The geo-spatial data package that we ship with includes some additional maps that install locally to be able to do some presentation and reference layers along the way. The drive time, the TomTom data. It's the very same data that's in your GPS in your car to be able to understand where you're going. So I have a point that's my customer and a point that's my store and I want to understand how many minutes of drive time it takes them to get across. It's using that TomTom product which is the same product that's in almost every GPS that's in your car along the way. So that data's available. And the spatial data's set. But if you don't have it, you can still do straight line, you can still build a circular radius around something, you can still... If you have latitude and longitude data or use one of the APIs to get it or Google, you can still build work flows in Alteryx that use spatial, so...

Okay. Then we're going to talk a little bit about the mapping tools as well and the different tools that are available for that. The map input tool, the reporting map, which Damien did some reporting this morning as well. And then the browse tool and tools like CartoDB where we can ship data out to a third party Cloud environment to be able to do some mapping as well. All right.

So spatial analytics, the ability to take in... Is the ability to take and be able to queries and analysis on your data that has no other reference than where it exists in the university. So point in polygon would be if I had no idea what the county latitude and longitude fell in and I wanted to figure that out, I could have a county layer with the shapes, the polygons for the counties and another data stream coming in that just had the point location for all of my customers. And if I wanted to drop my customers into the county, I could do a spatial match and essentially doing a query without having any other reference except for a location.

All right, so... Good. We're done with the PowerPoint. Let's get out of here. Let's get into Alteryx for a while and play. Any questions so far before I start drilling in too deep? Any... Good. So, we'll stop a little bit along the way and we'll make sure that we can cover some questions as we're going along. So let's... Let's start out with this work flow. Let's look at what we have. I just got an input file. Happens to be a... No base map underneath here, so we just see a point. Let's put a base map under it. And this little dot happens to be where I live. So we can zoom out. I live up in Rochester, New York. Right... Not too far from Lake Ontario. So other side of the country. Will that refresh quick enough? There we go. So that's Lake Ontario. So nowhere near New York City, like 400 miles away.

But let's do some exploration. Let's try and find out a little bit about what's going on around where I live. So I'm going to go into my spatial tools, and that's latitude and longitude, that's a spatial object. If we look at the data view down here in that browse tool. Maybe. Why is that not moving? Okay. That's really strange. That's really, really strange. Not quite sure what to do about that. Let's see. Oh, I know. Let's go to options, user settings, restore defaults. Let's see if that tweaks it enough to let me do anything along the way here. There we go. All right. Anybody know any good songs, jokes we can give this a second to refresh here. Maybe we'll be starting from scratch. There we go. All right. Okay. So if we look at the data view, this spatial object is that point that's coming from the browse tool right over here. Okay. Good. So now I want to do a radius around it. So let's talk a little bit about building a radius.

So here's a 5 mile radius. Let's put a browse tool after it so we can look at it on a map. Let's do a couple different things with it. So the way that this tool works, 'cause we promised an advanced class, is that right here is my 5 mile radius to be able to make that. But I could do a donut, so I could go... I could take a say I wanted a 1 mile radius, put in a coma, then I want a 1 mile to 3 miles radius, put another coma, then put a 3 mile to a 5 mile radius as we're going along. What that's going to do is it's going to make three rows of data. And see here it recorded inside of my data which radius we're looking at as we're coming along. But if I come over here and we look at the map view an we can put our reference map underneath here as well. So... There we go. TomTom US. If I click on these, you'll see that these are actually donuts. So they're a polygon, it's a circular polygon, but it's got another inner polygon that's the cut out, the spatial cutout for it.

So if I were to measure working this way the populous, let's say the population counts or something along the way. I would know what the population count was in here, and then just that donut outside of it, and then just the donut outside of it over here, which is very different than if I would have come through here and just gone 1 comma 3 comma 5 because then I'm double counting. So the... As we come over here and take a look at this, now... Actually, they're stacked wrong. So let's put in a sort tool. And let's see, what are they sorted now? They are sorted 1, 3, and 5. Let's put the 1 on top, so we'll just do a quick sort by radius size. And instead of ascending we'll go descending. And magically we'll have a wedding cake. So when we take a look at this, we can see that this covers from here to there, but this outer one also covers everything from the middle. So if I was doing some kind of a count of people by not making those donuts, by making it go complete, I would be double or triple counting some of the people as they were coming down through.

Okay, so now I wan to take a look... Let's just drop this back. We did some drive time stuff yesterday, so I don't think I'll go too deep into that, but let's just do a 5 mile radius, a nice simple one. And let's talk about the Calgary tools a little bit. Because if you're doing a lot of point in polygon or spatial analytics, you'll probably want to take some of your spatial fields and you'll want to use the Calgary loader and you'll want to create indexes for your data and maybe save them into Calgary format. If I did a point in polygon or a spatial join between 100 plus million records, so let's go out and grab the Experion household file along the way. And in the configuration here for this tool. It's going to allow me to pick the spatial object that's my trade area over here my query criteria. And then I can choose the spatial object that's in the Calgary data over here. And what I'm going to do... What I want... What it's going to do is it's going to pull out every single record from the household file that happens to be within that 5 mile trade area.

So instead of having to do a spatial match, it's going to do the spatial match inside of the this Calgary tool. But I could also specify other criteria here, too. So if I wanted to come along and maybe go grab this presence of children field over here and... What am I doing here? So... Let's see. Version 3. So 0 to 18 children, 0 to 18... We'll just grab this one here and it will only give me households that have children in that age range. So if I'm a clothing store, and I'm looking at a new site, then I'm selling children's clothing. I might only care about the households that have that data. So within 5... Within that distance of me, I have now 6,230 potential households that have children between 0 and 18, as we're working with... But that work flow just queries 133,930,845 different records, and only pulled out the 6,000 that met the criteria that I had within... 6,230 within that spatial... Within that spatial circle that we did. The spatial object that we did. Extremely fast way to be able to work with geo-spatial data, if you're doing that. And you can load your data into the Calgary format as you're going along.

All right. So let's do something a little bit different here. Let's go out and start a new work flow. This time, I'm going to bring in a DMA. I'm going to bring in... A DMA here. So I'm going to click on here. We'll bring in... Somebody shout out where are you from? Detroit. Okay. So I'm going to grab the Detroit trade area, Detroit, Michigan. Right, no, it's not the trade area. The DMA, I'm sorry. And add a browse tool after it. So this is the allocate input tools. If you have the spatial package or the data package or the Ultra XU, you have data in these. If you open it up and see that where this says choose a data set and it's empty, you can actually go out to downloads.alteryx.com and you can download the US census data. Now, it's getting a little bit long in the tooth because they do it every 10 years and it was done 7 years ago, but it still will have all of these census geographies and things like that associated. I don't think you'll get zip codes, but you will get census tracks in counties and DMAs and all of that stuff. And you'll get some variables to be able to pull in, too.

So if I wanted to come over here, do a current year estimate, pull in the total households or total population in Detroit, Michigan, I could add that data as I was going along. But it will give me the spatial object that represents Detoit over here. So now that I have that, let's say I wanted to try and pick... Find an area or make a map... A heat map to be able to understand where people lived that spent the most money or had the highest incomes or the largest families. Right now I've just got this polygon to work with right here, so I'm going to go into my spacial tools. I actually want to split that up into smaller areas. So I'm going to take the make grid tool, drop that into the work flow. And this... Right now the grid size defaults at 1 mile. We can leave it at that or we can bump it up to 5 miles, so it'll make 25 square mile grids as we go along.

And we can change it after we build the work flow. But I picked the spatial object that I want to work with, which there's only one. And then I can choose to clip it to the shape of the DMA or I could have it not clipped to the shape, which just means that my grids will stay square even where they overlap. So then we're going to run this and take a look at what we get in our browse tool. And now we've created these grids. So once I have these grids and either would the demographic data that... With the demographic data that we were working with before or with the Experion data, or the census data that I was telling you about that you could download at no charge from downloads.alteryx.com. I can now take and drop in a... What's called an allocate append. And what it's going to do is it's going to look at the demographics, which have been broken down into block points for apportionment, big fancy work. Which just means it's going to take the population of that area and it's going to portion it into each one of those little grid cells as we're going along.

So let's take and we'll grab the Experion US data here. Let's do something interesting. So we'll go... It's about 3,000 variables inside of here. We're going to fill the grid, 'cause remember this is a polygon so it has an area associated with. And for the inside of that area, we're going to pull the demographics from that. I always think about it as filling up like a vessel with water, that I'm going to fill each one of those squares with the demographic variables that I want to pull out or the business variables. So let's look... Basic variables, current year estimate, income. Let's do... I don't want to do aggregate income. I think I'll do per capita income because aggregate income might be just where there's a lot of people, it's going to add up all the income. So if there's more people, even if they make less money, it's going to be a larger aggregate income. I just want to understand per person where all of the money in Detroit is. So we're going to run this work flow again and make sure that it is working okay.

There we go. So it's going to go out, it's going to pull that Detroit demographic. It should be running faster than this. There we go. Good. So now I have that average income per person value over here. And in 9 seconds. Isn't it sad that when you're working with Alteryx that 9 seconds feels like forever. I mean, when I used to work with [inaudible 00:20:44] products, I could go get coffee in between doing the same exact thing. And now I'm up here apologizing for 9 seconds. Okay. So now we've filled up that population. Let's make a map of it. So there is a mapping tools in that reporting category. And how many other people saw and are really excited about the reporting tools that they're coming out with that you can actually put things together and make them look good. I've been fighting these reporting tools for 11 years since Alteryx was introduced, and really, really looking forward to those.

Okay, so, the report map... This is really strange how long it's taking to do things here. I'm going... In the report map... So let's do, we'll do an 8 by 8 map. We can change the sizes of the map inside of here. We can decide what we want to do for the reference space map here, so let's grab our TomTom data, 'cause that's local. Now I can go over to my data tab, and I have that input coming in over here. So I have this... I have the grid. So the grid I want to be my spatial field. I have my thematic field, which is going to be that income. Which is really weird 'cause I thought I only had one income column there. I don't know why this is running so slow. I'm going to have to switch over here to the other stuff. Okay. Oh, okay. Oh, you know why because these number right here, these first two were the variables that I pulled in about the count of households and the other stuff from that county file. So that got replicated over there. We just need the one all the way to the right, which is going to be our...

So this is what we're going to do our theme on. So our thematic field is going to be this last one, CYC, which is our income. We don't need a label field, we don't need a grouping field here, but then we're going to go over into layers. And we have to add that layer. Kind of would have thought we would have added it already, but that's just attaching to the data in the first part. And now we're going to add that layer into our map. Once we've added it in, we can come over here and we can choose a style. So for this map, I don't want to have any outlines. So instead of... I'm going to take this outline and it's right now 3 pixels wide. And I'm going to turn it to zero. And then I'm going to go under theme and when I'm doing heat mapping like this, I always like to say that red is hot and blue is not. So red's going to be the highest income, blue's going to be the lowest income. That's just the theme that I like to use. But if you chose to, you could make light green and dark green, the darker the green, the more the money, right? As you're going along.

And let's just drop this browse tool in over here. And over on this. But I have no idea why things are reacting so slowly here. Maybe it's the internet connection. Maybe it still thinks it's trying to connect to my hotel room or something and being slow. All right, there we go. We could runt his stuff a thousand times before you get up in front of people to do a demo and it always is going to slow down on you when you get ready to go. So let's pop this up bigger, let's take a look at what we got. So if we look at this in terms of Detroit... So the person who shouted out Detroit, does this sort of map with what you would think for... In terms of where people live that have more money and less money along the way? Are these some... This is probably Rochester Hills or whatever right inside of here, isn't it? Oh, the money's in the suburbs. Yeah, if you look in Detroit, yeah. If we would have done it the other way around though, there might be enough population to be able to boost it up.

What's really nice about Alteryx, one of my favorite things is that if you don't like what you get, you could very easily change it. So that was a 5 mile grid. Let's just go back and do a 1 mile grid so that we have a little bit higher level of accuracy along the way. We'll run this one more time and then we'll jump into a couple other examples of stuff that I put together. We have about 15 minutes left, so we're good. I want to make sure we leave a few for Q&A along the end. All righty. Okay, good. 18 seconds. Unacceptable. Okay. So we'll pop this up into a new window and there we go. So now we have even higher level of accuracy for what we're doing here. The highest one would be $54,000 per person. So if you break that down by household, 4 people per household, that's not bad. I would like to move over into some of those neighborhoods. All righty. Okay. So question on that, and then I'm going to move into just a couple other pre-built work flows I think and just show you some other cool stuff that's useful.

Yes, sir?

Crowd question:
[inaudible 00:25:54]

Gene Rinas:
Oh, this allocate tool? Okay, yeah. The question was, can I show the configuration here in the second allocate tool? And... Here we go. So what we've done... The mistake I always make when I'm working with these things... I'll do a trade area around a bunch of stores, 'cause I used to be a geo-spatial analyst. I started using Alteryx 11 years ago, I joined the company about 5 years ago. And the mistake I always made was I tried to fill up a point and I'd always get zeros back for when I was doing stuff, 'cause there's nothing to fill in a point, right? So in this case, grid's the only spatial object. So I've chosen the spacial object that I want to fill. If there's more than one, you can choose which one. And then over here we've chosen the variables that we want to pull out. And the tool does the rest. Yep. Okay, cool.

All right. So this is an interesting analysis here. I put this together admittedly this morning, I probably should have planned ahead a little more than that. But... This was something that I actually had to do for a company once in the past. They had to understand for purposes of taxation what their overlap was for the counties in the area of their stores. They had to understand did they cover 100% of the county or did they cover a small portion of it? It had more to do with some not-for-profit business things and money that they were getting in. It wasn't taxes, money they were getting in from the county. So as they went out to the county. So this takes and brings in a spacial object, actually an address. This is the Alteryx office in Broomfield, Colorado. I'm drawing a 20 mile radius around it. So if we were to take... And let's put a browse tool in here so that we can see what that looks like as well, just to have it make more sense.

So I have this 20 mile radius, and then I have all the counties for Colorado coming in. So there are 64 counties in Colorado. So here's that 20 mile trade area, here's the 64 counties in Colorado. Colorado is such a nice square state. You'd think that they'd make their counties square in the middle of it as well, but... And then... So over here, if we look at the output that I have coming out of the match side... I always forget to put my browser's on here so that you can see what's happening along the way. So there's the one's out of the match side. These would be all the counties... The used side or the unmatched side would be all of the counties that didn't match or weren't within 20 miles of Broomfield. Again, this is working very slow. I'm going to give up on you in a minute. Let me run this one more time so we can look at the other stuff as well. So there's the maps.

Jump up here. This should render fairly quickly. So here's our spatial object of 20 miles, here's all of the counties' outlines. And you can see that this county up here... What I want to do is I want to understand what percentage of this county this little overlap piece is right here. So the next step is to use the tool that... Usually demos we don't talk too much about. But this is the spatial process tool, and that will allow you to take and do a bunch of things. So if you have two objects that are touching each other, you can combine the two together. If you have... And you can kind of see what's going on over in here. If you want to cut one from the other, sometimes you might want to just cut one out from the other to be able to do somethings... And you can also create an intersection object. So what we end up with coming out of here... This is pretty cool. I now have that 20 mile radius, but I also have the portion of the county cut out, basically like I took that 20 mile radius as a cookie cutter and I cut out the middle of a puzzle. That was the counties.

So now I... There's a tool in the spatial toolbox that's called spatial info. And you can pull a bunch of information out of here. You can do the type of spatial object, the length, the bounding rectangle. I'm using the area, so I'm calculating the area square miles of the county object, and then I'm calculating the overlap object with that cut out one for the area square miles. It's all in the same data stream. If we look down at the data, we can see here that we can see the square miles of the whole county and the square miles of the overlap portion of it. Then I'm doing just a simple percentage calculation and to make it easier to understand. There you go. I'm multiplying it by a 100 so I'm putting it in terms of whole percentages. But now inside of here inside of my data, I can see what the percentages of each one of those. So if I click on the row here, we can see that this is 19% of the county. This one up here is 3.87% of the county that's overlapped. So you can combine these tools together to be able to cut and create new objects and then be able to do calculations on the fly when you're working with those.

That's a pretty interesting use case that uses quite a few of the tools. Any questions about that? Anybody still awake? Sorry? Put you to sleep. Yeah?

Crowd question:
[inaudible 00:31:09]

Gene Rinas:
Yeah. Oh, and see what the size of the population is. We could have used allocate to take the population of the county and the population of the area that we covered. And we could have done that calculation in terms of percentage of area, which is what we did. Percentage of ground. And calculated the percentage of the people, which around the city of Detroit might be very different if you are in the inside area.

Crowd question:
[inaudible 00:31:37]

Gene Rinas:
It could all mention to the spatial object, yep. It's really, really great. And again, if you don't have any data in your allocate tool, go out and get the census data. We put it out there for you. Government doesn't charge money to us, so we don't charge money to you for it. All right. So and here's another use case, then we'll open up to questions. We're down to about... We got about 10 minutes left here, but... This was a pretty crazy thing from my past that I did where... I'm using the Alteryx mapping tool that we used before. And over here I have a bunch of coordinates. And the objective was... I was working with this company that said, "We need to do a radar chart that looks like this. If we can make a radar chart look like this, we'll buy Alteryx." And we went into the charting tools and tried all of them, talked to the developers. And they're like, "Oh, yeah, that's a pretty specialized chart. There's no way to do it."

You guys know what a radar chart is? It's like a... I think 5 or 6 different radiuses around and then you measure each category and you make a polygon that fills it. So I thought, "This is really just a map." So I took an calculated for each one of my areas, and I'll show this on a map in minute. What the latitude and longitude to be to draw this chart around zero latitude and zero longitude, so out in the middle of the ocean. So I... When I got done, I'm bringing everything into the mapping tool over here. Let's run this once. And it allows an input... I actually built it as a macro so I could feed it the values for their target stuff. But I built all the polygons using the poly build and then over here... There we go. I end up with what looks like a chart, but it's really a map. And this point in the middle is 0,0 latitude and longitude in the middle of the ocean somewhere. So I'm able to take and use the polygon build tools and the mapping tool to build this really cool radar chart for capabilities summary. They were doing some signal work around process improvement, and they wanted to use a radar chart like this.

And the only way we were able to build it. And when it ends up in the report, it looks exactly like a chart from a charting tool, but really we've just plotted all of these coordinates and we've built the polygons in a mapping tool. So you can use Alteryx geo-spatial tools that have nothing to do with geo-spatial along the way, but... Okay, so... Either I'm going to let you guys go really early or we need to have you guys ask some questions here. So does anybody have any questions about geo-spatial or anything we talked about along the way?

Yes, sir?

Crowd question:
[inaudible 00:34:27]

Gene Rinas:
Yeah.

Crowd question:
[inaudible 00:34:33]

Gene Rinas:
I'm sorry, you're talking about the resources in terms of the data?

Crowd question:
Yeah. [inaudible 00:34:39]

Gene Rinas:
Yep. So the physical maps that I was just working with were from TomTom. So let's go back to our... One of our maps here. And... Actually, we could just go to browse tool if we wanted to. I don't know why that's responding so slowly when I click on a tool. Let's run this once, that's why. So the base maps that we have, some of them just are... You can have for free with Alteryx. Other one's come from spatial. Some of them connect to data that's external. And... Where's one that's been around... Here we go. Base map, that's what I'm trying to look for. So I have a bunch of stuff. I have... We now ship with Digital Globe is the main one and Carto which are two different map rendering engines that I think you have just out of the box with Alteryx. The TomTom stuff installed is part of the spatial package, and then the USGS stuff... I don't know if that comes normally installed, I think that's available for free out on the download, too. That's just US geographical survey stuff. Those are really un-detailed maps, but if you just want to be able to get a feel for where something else... It's one I never use. It's not all that pretty, but anyway...

So, yeah. So it's either part of the data install or it can be some stuff that we pull out of the Cloud. Yes, sir?

Crowd question:
Is there a way to do the layering on the layering on the maps differently? 'Cause sometimes it's hard to see what's underneath your 20% shading...

Gene Rinas:
Yeah. Great, great question. Let's try to get to the work flow that we built with a map in it. Was it this one? 'Cause I can show you all that with the underlying map. And why is... Okay. Here we go. All right, so this is the mapping tool for... And I can bring in... I only have one data stream coming in here, but I could have 50 data streams in with different stuff that I wanted to map. Over here on the layers tab you can get into it, and the base map that we have here... Now, it's going to put the polygons at the bottom, but I could come in here and right now it's showing military bases. If I wanted to disable military bases, I could disable military bases. If I wanted to come up here to... So just expand these, to the lines. Different kinds of roads, maybe I don't want to... I want to show major highways, but I want to get rid of local roads. I can click on local roads and disable it. I could also override the style inside of here. So if I wanted to change the color of certain types of roads.

But this is all part of the base map. You can move things around this layer. If I wanted to move it up on top of the roads, I could have it sit on top of the roads instead of under the roads. I can move layers however I want.

Crowd question:
[inaudible 00:37:41]

Gene Rinas:
To... By default, the roads are at the top. If you wanted something to sit over the top of the roads and then make it kind of transparent to look through or something, you can... Inside of this style and theme on here, you can adjust the opacity. So if you want to make polygons solid or less solid along the way, you can adjust your fill colors. We're using a thematic here, but you can change the fill color if you weren't doing a thematic. For point layers, you can change the shape of the point. Make it a star, make it a square, make it circle, make it bigger, make it smaller. Yeah, huge amount of flexibility, all inside of this layers tab, all inside of this area right here. Yes, sir?

Crowd question:
Oh.

Gene Rinas:
Oh, okay.

Crowd question:
So I have some polygon spatial objects that I exported... Or imported from a KML file. And I was curious if there is a relatively quick way without writing a macro or anything to extract all of the lat and longs for the entire polygon?

Gene Rinas:
Yeah, so the question... You heard the question. I'm so used to people shouting out questions and trained myself to repeat the questions. Anyway... I don't know. I'd have to take a look at what the KML file looked like. It may actually be in the underlying data view of that KML file. So rather them bringing in and treating it as a spatial object, you might actually be able to bring it in as text file and strip that stuff out even easier. The other way would be if it's coming in as polygons and you just want to have those... Are you a Tableau user or something? You're trying to push those to Tableau? So the real secret there... Let's go back to that work flow with my house. But there's a macro called Polygons for Tableau, have you heard of it? That Alteryx built? So it installs with the Tableau kit, so it's alteryx.com/kit. Used to be one of the URLs to get to it, but look for Tableau kit inside of there.

And if I go to my Tableau category... There it is. Here's that 5 mile radius of my house. I'm going to take this Polygons for Tableau, thank you. No, that's [inaudible 00:40:02]. Polygons for Tableau. Connect it right here. Choose my polygon layer which is... We don't want the trade area, we don't want the spatial object. This is one record coming into this macro and when I export it, it will be many records. So 101. So it broke that circle into 101 points, and if we take a look at it, we have the polygon number and we have the point order. So if there were multiple polygons in there, it would be a different polygon. And for each polygon, here's your point order. Here's the latitude, here's the longitude. That would be the way I would do it is just to find that macro that we built. Yeah. And we only have two minutes left or... But go up to the solutions center later and I can show you how to... You probably know how to read into Tableau anyway, but you just take that point order and set it as the path. Yeah, works really good.

Crowd question:
[inaudible 00:41:06]

Gene Rinas:
What's that?

Crowd question:
[inaudible 00:41:07]

Gene Rinas:
Do they? Okay. Made it easier. So I'll put your [inaudible 00:41:12] as a shape file, he said that they probably do that.

Crowd question:
Could you cover the legend customizations?

Gene Rinas:
Yeah.

Crowd question:
[inaudible 00:41:18] new work flow too?

Gene Rinas:
Thank you. We'll just talk about that quickly. Okay, so down in here, there's a legend tab. And you can adjust what the legend looks like, but there's also a tool in reporting that will let you split up the legend as well so the legend can be in a different layer and you can float it over and put it in different places. But you can modify the text color, the font, the width of the icons inside of there, so it's all pretty... Have you'd one much mapping with Alteryx yet? Mostly [inaudible 00:41:56], yeah. I don't know. It's not being recorded, right? I was an Esri partner and an Alteryx partner back when I worked for the consulting firm before I came here. I loved Esri for making really pretty maps, I hated it for doing analytics. So I would build all of my... I would do all of my analytics Alteryx, and I would output a couple of shape files and I would make a really pretty map that the client was expecting to pay a ton of money for, rather than try to do it all in Alteryx. But if I needed to make 10,000 maps, I would use Alteryx and try to get it as good as I could because I could do that much faster than even Mapbook and Esri, but...

Okay, so that is my 45 minutes of fame. Remember to go out to the survey in your app. Remember, if you don't have anything nice to say, don't say anything at all. But it's been a pleasure having you guys all join me here. I'm going to go up to the Solutions Center after if you have other questions.

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